Friday, October 27, 2017

Quote of the week

Insight: Exploring the familiar by Lorraine Glowczak

It is no secret that I am relatively new to Windham. Although, technically, my address has been in Windham for three years, the first two years were spent working and going to school in Portland. Windham was only a place I laid my head.
Since becoming the editor of The Windham Eagle, I now live here “full time” and have learned so much about Windham in the process (and Raymond, too).

This past Saturday I took the opportunity to participate in the Windham Historical Society’s Fall History Tour (see front page for details) and realized there’s a lot more I have yet to discover here - such as how beautiful it is and the depth of historical character it contains. 

I love to travel and explore new areas, but I am acutely aware that I have overlooked this seemingly ordinary, hometown spot, that sits along Route 302; a town that many tourists also neglect as they travel westward or eastward along that popular road, to more “important” and well-known destinations.

From my own personal experience, I find truth in the fact that traveling to other cultures and lands makes an individual more well-rounded, helps them to discover more about themselves, provides different perspectives and educates in a delightful, albeit sometimes challenging, way.

Although, I find that these statements have validity, that doesn’t mean exploring your own backyard won’t provide the same results.

We have all heard the ever popular “staycations” and no one thinks twice when someone chooses to stay home to explore Portland; but I’m certain if someone announces they are going to stay home and sightsee Windham and/or Raymond, the response would most likely be that of disbelief. 

But paying attention and realizing what is directly in front of you can also refresh one’s perspectives, making the old - new again. To explore your hometown with new eyes, as if seeing things for the first time, can also lead to new discoveries and a well-rounded character. With new eyes one can explore the known, only to discover there is more to uncover.

As I write this insight, it is more of a lesson for myself. But I suspect others who journey often to faraway lands, may also forget, that exploring their home town can challenge pre-conceived notions and add to the collection of well-traveled knowledge. 

Try it sometime. You just might notice something new and gain a whole different perspective of where you live.

Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor,

David Nadeau is running for Town Council. 

I have known David for a number of years and his tireless dedication to the betterment of Windham warrants returning him to the Town Council. 

David and I recently served on the Windham Comprehensive Plan Review Committee where his intimate knowledge of the council, the town and the state proved beneficial to our discussions. I found David to be an active listener and hearing everyone's point of view when forming an opinion. 
Re-electing David provides the Town Council a point of continuity and stability which will serve them well as they all work to lead the town in the coming years.

Please join me in voting for David Nadeau.

Sparky Hurgin

To the Editor:

Medicare’s Open Enrollment period is now underway and it is important to remember that this is the only time of year when Medicare beneficiaries can make changes to their coverage. The Medicare Open Enrollment period began on October 15th and Mainers currently on Medicare have until December 7th to add, drop or change prescription drug and health care plans for 2018. It is a good idea for all Medicare beneficiaries to review their options each year during open enrollment.  

People with Medicare can use the Medicare Plan Finder at to research prescription drug and health plans that will be available in 2018. After reviewing available plans, there are a few things to consider that can help you select the plan that is best for you. 

For one thing, you may want to review costs, including monthly premiums and the annual deductible. You’ll also want to review coverage for the doctors and pharmacies included in the plan, along with the prescription drugs and other services you need. It is also important to consider quality ratings which are based on the quality of care and the customer service each plan provides.

For in-person help, call your local Area Agency on Aging at 1-877-353-3771. Their staff and volunteers are fully-trained, certified State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) counselors, that can help you navigate Medicare and the complexity in choosing drug plans with deductibles, copays and how to address the coverage gap (the so called the “donut hole”). This process can be confusing, but the Area Agencies on Aging are ready to help you.

You don’t have to make any changes if you don’t need or want to, but this is the only time to evaluate your options. Making a smart decision now can help you get the care you need in 2018.

William Phillips, M.D.
AARP Maine Volunteer Advisory Council

Dear Editor,

I am writing in support of David Nadeau for Town Council. 

I have known David for many years, have watched him in action with the council and served on a committee with him. He was a regular observer on another committee that I was part of and he has always been well informed and respectful. His 10 years’ experience on the planning board and six years on the council should continue to serve the town well. 

I believe he is an asset deserving of re-election.

Allan Phinney

To the Editor, 

Rights, Respect and Responsibility

 I find I get a bit concerned over the “kneeling thing” and many other issues like it, in this new world we all live in. The respect for customs/events/traditions in our country has slipped by the wayside.

We all want our country’s freedoms to remain. However, responsibilities come with freedoms. We, as Americans, promote others speaking their mind and voicing their opinions, and bringing about change . . . that’s what we stand for. But, at the risk of sounding terribly old fashioned, there is a correct place and time; and more importantly, a correct way. Most of us know how to behave at functions. Why?  Because we “respect” the event and people connected to it . . . whether we agree with everything or not. If we can’t do that, then we have the freedom to not be at that particular function. Our new world labels its unacceptable and rude behavior as “its right.” Yes it is our right. 

However I suggest we call it what it truly is: It’s the right to be disrespectful that we are activating when we act inappropriately. Everyone is so over-sensitive about “their rights” (like children) that they have literally erased the “be respectful” line - and that seems to be okay - because it’s all done under the banner of  “rights”. Unfortunately, the bar for our society’s behavior has been lowered tremendously in an extremely short amount of time. What used to be deemed inappropriate is now labeled as “one’s right.” A basic fact of civilized life is: The minute we encounter another person throughout each day, we all - under the banner of respect - have to momentarily set a few of our rights aside. Don’t we all do that the very minute we interact with someone? Don’t we automatically shift our behavior, for the moment? For example: Don’t we wait for another to stop talking before we begin to talk? We all abide by alternate behaviors in order to communicate with someone else. That is called “respect” (and maturity). Sure, I can exercise my “right” to not momentarily shift my behavior when I interact with a person. I can exercise my “rights” and talk over them while they are talking. 

But, the only right I’m truly exercising at that point - is my right to be rude. Where does that get me? 

Whatever issues I want to promote, can certainly be done in the proper place at the proper time and the proper way. There is a time and place for literally everything; and that is where one should exercise their rights for their issues. We all need to act as adults and learn where/when to exercise our rights; in a manner than doesn’t incite more loss of respect and promote anger and agitation. Anger and agitation are not catalysts for having your point of view heard - or accepted.  Certainly we have all learned that when a view point is delivered to us we often react to how it is delivered instead of the view point itself. Wouldn’t the wise thing to do, be to deliver our view points in a way that can be received? Yes we all have rights. We just need to be responsible enough to be sure, that when we are pushing our “rights” in some else’s face that we are not actually killing “respect” in the process.

Gayle Plummer